Evergreen Obscurus: The 10.5 Pound Turnip Edition

Evergreen House Resized

Greetings from Evergreen Museum & Library’s virtual office in my basement. For those of you new to us, the museum is housed in a 162-year-old Italianate mansion in the northern-most part of Baltimore City, about 2 miles from JHU’s Homewood campus. Evergreen was home to two generations of Baltimore’s Garrett family and is celebrated for […]


How to Use Artstor as a Study Tool

Fe?lix Vallotton, The Sick Patient, Helene Chatenay, 1892 Cropped

[This blog post was contributed by VRC Staff Emily McDonald (Writing Seminars)] As the end of the semester approaches, students are turning to Artstor, a database that houses more than 2.5 million images, plus the 183,000 local images in the JHU Visual Resources Collection. Artstor functions not only as an archive of collections of images […]


Digital Pedagogy and the Great Global Online Learning Experiment

Teaching Online

COVID-19 has enrolled many of us in higher education in an unexpected experiment in online learning. While many classroom teachers have been practitioners of hybrid pedagogy for years—in-person meetings facilitated or complemented by digital texts, tools, and activities, learning management systems like Blackboard, and operational platforms like SIS—we find ourselves suddenly adapting by necessity to […]


New JHU Public Collection in Artstor: Chinese Public Health Campaign Slides 1950s-1970s

Slide depicting a female scientist looking into a microscope

Physically housed in the Sheridan Libraries’ Special Collections, the Johns Hopkins University: Chinese Public Health Campaign Slides 1950s-1970s collection is newly available digitally via Artstor. JHU faculty, students, and staff have access to Artstor and its more than 2.5 million images, as well as the 181,500+ images in the JHU Visual Resources collection. This Chinese […]


How Do We Find Geospatial Data?

From using GPS to navigate traffic to apps tailoring selections based on location, geospatial data is integral to our daily lives. Researchers also increasingly use geospatial data. For example, in a recent article featuring several Johns Hopkins researchers, geospatial data was used to understand sub-surface features of an archaeological site in modern-day Oman. Currently, I […]


The Spirit of ’68

 1968 was marked by war and protest, tragedy and revolution—a year around which a whole era of political turmoil, cultural change, and social unrest turned. So much happened in one year, including: The Tet Offensive and the My Lai Massacre in Vietnam. The “Prague Spring” liberalizations in Czechoslovakia, followed by the Soviet invasion. The assassination […]


Reflections On Pine: The Movement Continues

2017 marked the 50th anniversary of civil unrest in Cambridge, Maryland and the Pine Street Rebellion, following decades of economic and educational segregation in the small Eastern Shore town. In honor of Black History Month, Homewood Museum presents a talk by Dion Banks and Kisha Petticolas, co-founders of the Eastern Shore Network for Change (ESNC), […]


Why We March

When people feel they are not being represented—that their voices and experiences don’t matter, when they feel there is a great wrong in the world, and when they have simply had enough—they often take to the streets and march. Increased acts of civil disobedience rose around the world after Percy Shelley’s poem The Mask of […]