In with the New, Discover the Old: Public Collections on Artstor and Free Images for Publication

 Your semester has gotten off to a great start! Yet, you realize you need images to accompany your teaching and research  — unique, exceptional images. Preparing PowerPoints or Keynote presentations? Looking for images for your classes? Use Artstor! JHU faculty, students, and staff have access to Artstor and its more than 2 million images, plus […]


A Busy Campus and a Busy Library

Welcome (or welcome back) to campus! The empty sidewalks of summer are quickly filling up again with students, making the Homewood campus feel like Richard Scarry’s Busytown. New and returning students and faculty are always curious about library services and resources. We will soon be busy ourselves, answering those questions. When is the library open? […]


Johns Hopkins Open Access Policy

Johns Hopkins joins peer institutions, such as Harvard, MIT, and The University of California, by instituting a faculty open access policy. Many funders also require their researchers to make articles publicly available; NIH and The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation are two examples. There are many reasons for making research articles freely available to any […]


Museum and Society Students visit Sheridan Libraries’ Conservation Labs

Recently Conservation & Preservation hosted two classes in the Sheridan Libraries’ Conservation Labs for the undergraduate Museums and Society course, Conservation of Material Culture: Art, Artifacts and Heritage Sites. Taught by Professor, and Objects Conservator, Lori Trusheim, the class introduces students to the fundamental aspects of conservation with a goal of understanding how conservation contributes […]


The Baltimore “Redlining” Map: Ranking Neighborhoods

For those studying Baltimore’s social, economic, and redevelopment history, one of the most frequently referenced maps in our collection is the Residential Security Map of Baltimore Md. Published in 1937 by the Federal Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC), this map is often called the Baltimore redlining map.  In drafting the map, cartographers used the colors […]


Time for a Timeline

Guest blogger: Macie Hall, from the CER‘s Innovative Instructor. After the discussion at our April 1st Lunch and Learn: Faculty Conversations on Teaching on the topic Alternatives to the Research Paper, I was asked about applications for creating timelines. Fortunately there are some good options freely available. TimelineJS, developed at Northwestern University’s Knight Lab, uses a Google spreadsheet […]


Virtual Shelf Browse Feature in Catalyst

There’s nothing quite like serendipitous discovery. I love going into the stacks to look for one book, and coming back with an armful of others that pique my interest. Don’t have time to head to the library? You can get that same feeling by using the Virtual Browse feature in Catalyst, and then request the […]