Fairytales, Ghost Stories, and Eerie Literature – Part 1

A sketch of a statuette depicting Cthulhu, drawn by his creator, H. P. Lovecraft, 1934. Resembles a human man with an octopus-like head.

Each part of the world has its own collection of stories written to frighten readers. Their degree of fear can range from friendly giants roaming the tranquil countryside to the paranormal haunting a castle. What was once shared around the campfire in the dark shadows of a forest is now viewed on smart devices as […]


Freshman Library Orientation 2018

Jen Ditkoff, Student Engagement and Information Fluency Librarian, and Heidi Herr Academic Liaison, Special Collections facilitated this week’s freshman orientation at the library and it was a blast! Things started off with a bang at “Fire & Ice” in the Macskey Room (BLC). This was an interactive session that gave new students the opportunity to ask […]


Books on Books

Since my earlier post on the subject of earlier books turning up in (or on) later ones, I’ve discovered many other examples of early modern recycling at work. I wanted to share one more example of “book covering” in the opposite direction, where the recycled leaves from earlier materials are still present. This example comes from another […]


Jobs, Internships, and Research Opportunities

Need a job or internship? Look no further. We’ve collected many of the resources available to JHU students here in a one-stop-shopping blog. STEM RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES ForagerOne : Created by Johns Hopkins undergraduate students, this website allows you (JHU students only) to search your research topic of interest (neuroscience, psychology, etc.) for professors who are […]


“Miss Minnie” in the Archives

The Hub reported last week that Minnie Hargrow, a longtime and beloved employee on Homewood Campus, passed away at the age of 96. Hargrow, known affectionately as “Miss Minnie” to the students, staff, faculty, and administrators who had the fortune of getting to know her, began her career at Hopkins as a cafeteria worker in the […]


Why We March

When people feel they are not being represented—that their voices and experiences don’t matter, when they feel there is a great wrong in the world, and when they have simply had enough—they often take to the streets and march. Increased acts of civil disobedience rose around the world after Percy Shelley’s poem The Mask of […]


Holiday Treats!

Are you eagerly anticipating traditional holiday foods? Or, perhaps you are interested in baking some cakes and cookies? Celebrate the spirit of the season with some cool recipes from our library and other collections that are available online for free. If you are in the mood to try out pudding, check out Plum Pudding: of […]


Digitized Daniel Coit Gilman correspondence now available

University Archives recently completed a project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (the granting arm of the National Archives) to digitize approximately 65,000 pages of letters received and sent by Daniel Coit Gilman. Gilman was Johns Hopkins University’s first president and is widely regarded as one of history’s most important education innovators. […]


History of the Library, Part III

In 1961, following several years of planning, the Trustees approved the construction of a new library facility at Homewood, and settled on the open end of the Keyser Quadrangle, facing Gilman Hall, as the ideal location. Architects Wrenn, Lewis, and Jencks proposed building the library primarily underground. Were such a structure to be built above […]