Category Archives: Special Collections

Women at the Front: Hopkins Nurses during WWI

While soldiers were fighting on the battlefield during the First World War, more than 10,000 nurses were fighting for the lives of sick and wounded military personnel. Thousands of brave women registered for the Army Nurse Corps during the First … Continue reading

WWI Student Army Training Corps: Hopkins Students Prepare for War

While many of us are familiar with photos of college students burning draft cards and protesting during the Vietnam War, far fewer people are aware of the impact that World War I had on the students of its time. In … Continue reading

Happy St. Crispin’s Day!

Anyone who has watched a stage or film version of Henry V (such as the 1944 Olivier version, infused with echoes of World War II, or the critically acclaimed 1990 Kenneth Branagh version) will remember Henry’s inspiring speech to his … Continue reading

John Staige Davis: Hopkins Alum and Pioneering WWI Plastic Surgeon

Plastic surgery has become something we take for granted in modern medicine as an important tool for healing those injured in warfare, but that wasn’t always the case. In the early 20th century, Dr. John Staige Davis worked tirelessly to … Continue reading

Enigmatic Edgar

Edgar Allan Poe’s death in Baltimore on October 7, 1849, ensured that the writer and the city would be forever linked. On October 7, 2016, come celebrate Poe’s life and legacy, and commemorate the anniversary of his death, at the … Continue reading

Hopkins and the Great War: Exhibit Opening, September 14th

Student soldiers living in Gilman Hall. Professors recruited to do research in chemical warfare. Wartime propaganda posters visible all over Baltimore. If you were a part of the Johns Hopkins community during the First World War, all these things and … Continue reading

The Arc of a Curious Career: Wallace Stevens in Print

For most readers of classroom anthologies, Wallace Stevens (1879-1955) equals a jar on a hill, a 13-point blackbird or a snow-man. And those are all delicious poems in the signature Stevens key—poems that vibrate at the juncture of the familiar and … Continue reading

Drawing and Believing: Blindfolds and Blind Faith

by Alicia Puglionesi, PhD Recipient (History of Medicine) and former fellow, Special Collections Research Center In Drawing and Believing, part 1, we met George Albert Smith, a British psychic medium, and the drawings that he supposedly produced using his telepathic … Continue reading

Sign Here!

Did you ever wonder why signatures and autographs carry the enormous weight they do? The history of this fancy of finger-work, this veritable cult of calligraphy is long and varied. Ever since humans fixed words to a medium, signatures of … Continue reading

Anne Boleyn

This poem, by Elizabeth Akers Allen (1832-1911), is one of many works that have been inspired by Anne Boleyn who lost her head 477 years ago. She had won the heart of Henry the VIII, but refused to become his … Continue reading