Category Archives: Hopkins

James Joseph Sylvester

When James Joseph Sylvester came to The Johns Hopkins University in 1876, he was the most senior of the original faculty, in terms of age and prior accomplishments. The university’s first professor of mathematics, Sylvester had already had a full … Continue reading

Follow Your Music

Music makes the world go ‘round. We all carry our music with us – on our devices or in our hearts, or both. But you can do more than that. JHU has one of the best music schools in the … Continue reading

Henry Augustus Rowland

When Daniel Coit Gilman was named president of The Johns Hopkins University in 1875, the trustees left the matter of recruiting faculty in his hands. With an eye to the future, Gilman sought to fill the ranks with “young scholars … Continue reading

Clipboards and Counting

Have you seen students walking around the library with clipboards this fall and wondered what the heck that was about? We’ve been documenting where and how people are using library spaces in anticipation of the 50th anniversary of the Milton S. … Continue reading

Museums as Laboratories

Homewood House is more than a museum full of beautiful objects. It serves as a laboratory for a Museums & Society class that Catherine Rogers Arthur teaches each fall.  Throughout the class, the students work to curate an exhibition that … Continue reading

Got a Research Idea? Get Paid to Do It!

For most researchers, grant writing is part of their job. As one of the best research institutions in the nation, Johns Hopkins offers a wide range of resources and services to its faculty and researchers and helps them compete for … Continue reading

Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, Professor of Greek

With this entry, I’m beginning a new series of articles on our original faculty – those named to full professorships before the University opened. Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, Johns Hopkins’ first professor of Greek, was born in 1831 in Charleston, South … Continue reading

What is the “Preparing Future Faculty Teaching Academy?”

In a job market growing ever more competitive, it is no surprise that higher education institutions are requesting more of young PhDs applying for teaching positions. Among the application materials required by many hiring institutions, for example, a portfolio testifying to … Continue reading

Robert Layfield, 1897-1915

I’m willing to bet that very few reading this have ever heard of Robert Layfield. There are no buildings named for him and no monument to his accomplishments. He wasn’t wealthy, he made no mark in academia, and he died … Continue reading

Jesse Lazear, 1866-1900

In the Alumni Memorial Residences on the Homewood Campus, there is a dorm house named for Jesse Lazear, who was described upon his death as “a martyr in the noblest of causes.” While Walter Reed gets credit for solving the … Continue reading