Category Archives: Hopkins

Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, Professor of Greek

Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, Johns Hopkins’ first professor of Greek, was born in 1831 in Charleston, South Carolina, and was orphaned at a young age. Gildersleeve proved to be a precocious child who displayed a hunger for classical learning. His determination … Continue reading

2nd Annual Human Library: Don’t Judge A Book By Its Cover

Join us on Sunday, April 30th from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. in Brody Learning Commons (adjacent to the Eisenhower Library) on the Homewood Campus of Johns Hopkins University for this free event! It’s open to the public and everyone is … Continue reading

Introducing Our Freshman Fellows: Faith Terry

For the past 5 months, I’ve been discovering what it means to be a student here at Hopkins. From the importance of academics and the shared sense of competition, to locating the steam tunnel entrances and avoiding the lines at … Continue reading

Hugh Hawkins Research Fellowships for the Study of Hopkins History: Apply by March 10th

Ever learn something amazing about Johns Hopkins University and thought, “Wow, I’d really like to know the story behind that!”? Well, now’s your chance! Apply for a Hugh Hawkins Research Fellowship for the Study of Hopkins History and spend 8 … Continue reading

Women at the Front: Hopkins Nurses during WWI

While soldiers were fighting on the battlefield during the First World War, more than 10,000 nurses were fighting for the lives of sick and wounded military personnel. Thousands of brave women registered for the Army Nurse Corps during the First … Continue reading

WWI Student Army Training Corps: Hopkins Students Prepare for War

While many of us are familiar with photos of college students burning draft cards and protesting during the Vietnam War, far fewer people are aware of the impact that World War I had on the students of its time. In … Continue reading

APL Technical Digest – Now 100% Online

The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) built a craft for NASA that’s been in space for a decade and passed Pluto last year. And remember the little “pill” that Senator and former astronaut John Glenn swallowed before he went … Continue reading

Recycling Roundup

With classes back in session, the library literally becomes a second home for many of you as a refuge from the heat. All that note taking, coffee drinking and draft revising produces a good deal of waste. Before you chuck … Continue reading

John Staige Davis: Hopkins Alum and Pioneering WWI Plastic Surgeon

Plastic surgery has become something we take for granted in modern medicine as an important tool for healing those injured in warfare, but that wasn’t always the case. In the early 20th century, Dr. John Staige Davis worked tirelessly to … Continue reading

Hopkins and the Great War: Exhibit Opening, September 14th

Student soldiers living in Gilman Hall. Professors recruited to do research in chemical warfare. Wartime propaganda posters visible all over Baltimore. If you were a part of the Johns Hopkins community during the First World War, all these things and … Continue reading