Author Archives: Jim Stimpert

Happy Birthday, Johns!

On May 19, 1795, Johns Hopkins was born in Anne Arundel County, the second of eleven children of Samuel and Hannah (Janney) Hopkins. His parents, members of the Society of Friends (Quakers), raised tobacco and owned slaves, who tended the … Continue reading

Hopkins Retrospective

Did you know there is a Tumblr site devoted to promoting Hopkins history? Leading up to Alumni Weekend on April 11-13, we will be posting photographs with captions commemorating earlier classes, particularly the Classes of 1954, 1959, 1964, 1969, 1974, 1979, … Continue reading

Ira Remsen, Professor of Chemistry

Have you ever felt pressure to follow a career path favored by your parents, rather than studying what you really enjoy? Ira Remsen did both – but not at the same time. Born February 10, 1846, in New York City, of … Continue reading

James Joseph Sylvester

When James Joseph Sylvester came to The Johns Hopkins University in 1876, he was the most senior of the original faculty, in terms of age and prior accomplishments. The university’s first professor of mathematics, Sylvester had already had a full … Continue reading

Henry Augustus Rowland

When Daniel Coit Gilman was named president of The Johns Hopkins University in 1875, the trustees left the matter of recruiting faculty in his hands. With an eye to the future, Gilman sought to fill the ranks with “young scholars … Continue reading

Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, Professor of Greek

With this entry, I’m beginning a new series of articles on our original faculty – those named to full professorships before the University opened. Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, Johns Hopkins’ first professor of Greek, was born in 1831 in Charleston, South … Continue reading

Robert Layfield, 1897-1915

I’m willing to bet that very few reading this have ever heard of Robert Layfield. There are no buildings named for him and no monument to his accomplishments. He wasn’t wealthy, he made no mark in academia, and he died … Continue reading

Jesse Lazear, 1866-1900

In the Alumni Memorial Residences on the Homewood Campus, there is a dorm house named for Jesse Lazear, who was described upon his death as “a martyr in the noblest of causes.” While Walter Reed gets credit for solving the … Continue reading

Summer at Hopkins, circa 1890

In the middle of summer, most of the students are long gone, faculty are planning their fall classes or doing their own research, and staff are looking forward to vacations. But there are still a lot of people on campus, … Continue reading

History of the Library, Part III

In 1961, following several years of planning, the Trustees approved the construction of a new library facility at Homewood, and settled on the open end of the Keyser Quadrangle, facing Gilman Hall, as the ideal location. Architects Wrenn, Lewis, and … Continue reading