History of the Library, Part II

A group of private citizens, headed by William Wyman and William Keyser, donated land that became the Homewood Campus in 1902, and the library moved into new quarters upon the completion of Gilman Hall in 1916. The library occupied the inner portion of a hollow square on three levels, placing faculty and graduate student offices […]


Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day

December 7th, 2017 marks the 76th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. (See the 75th commemoration here.). Pearl Harbor is a U.S. naval base situated on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. On December 7th, 1941, at approximately 7:55 a.m., the United States was launched into World War 2 (WW2) when aircraft from the Imperial […]


History of the Library – Part I

Each year Hopkins welcomes new students and faculty who may not know the history behind one of the academic world’s most renowned libraries. So, sit back as we tell the story of the Hopkins library, from the very beginning. This history will be divided into three monthly segments. This first segment covers the years 1876 […]


Hard-boiled and Noir Fiction and Film

Travelling through fetid alleyways in the pouring rain, through thronging cities like beating hearts, and darkened rooms echoing gunshots and last breaths, the fiction and film of the hard-boiled and noir genres bring readers and viewers along for vivid, engrossing, sensual experiences that earlier mysteries neglected in favor of purely intellectual exercises. Often used interchangeably, […]


Egypt: The Birthplace of Flip Flops?

It’s summer and flip-flops are in full bloom! Over the centuries, shoe designers have added heels, blinged them out, and crafted them from a variety of materials. The obsession for this ancient sandal has even sprouted its own national day (#nationalflipflopday). Today, the flip-flop industry generates billions in revenue sales (ref. Havaianas, 2017). So, who […]


Library Tourism

he Reading Room in the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (National Library of France), Paris.

At some point, we all travel and explore new places. While you’re globe-trotting, don’t forget to visit libraries! Seriously, some libraries are tourist attractions and well-worth a visit. Even the New York Times has recognized this insider’s tip! You could start close to home, in Washington DC, at the Library of Congress. The Jefferson Building, […]


Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, Professor of Greek

Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, Johns Hopkins’ first professor of Greek, was born in 1831 in Charleston, South Carolina, and was orphaned at a young age. Gildersleeve proved to be a precocious child who displayed a hunger for classical learning. His determination took him first to the College of Charleston, then to Jefferson College in Pennsylvania and […]


Watership Down – Book, Film, and Music

“Do tell me how I can help you,” said the Chief Rabbit. “Well sir,’ said Hazel rather hesitantly, ‘it’s because of my brother — Fiver here. He can often tell when there’s anything bad about, and I’ve found him right again and again. He knew the flood was coming last autumn,…and now he says he […]


Who Knew? Library Guides you might not expect!

When you think of libraries, what springs to mind? Books, research databases, datasets, videos, incredibly helpful librarians like me (smile)… right? Well, you might be surprised to know that the guides below are very popular among the MSEL’s biggest fans. Check them out! All the cool kids are… Career Information Need a job? Look here for lots of tips, […]