Lunch Bags and Laptops: Workshops About ORCID and Metrics

The Library is launching a new workshop series titled Lunch Bags and Laptops. The goal is to offer you a hands-on chance to examine different aspects of scholarly publishing. The first workshop will help you uniquely identify yourself as an author. The second will walk you through the different metrics and altmetrics that are available. […]


A Secret Weapon for You

Your librarians know a lot of things. A lot of things. That knowledge comes from many sources, including our widely differing kinds of experience; the kind of books and shows and music we like; and our various academic degrees, including a master’s degree from an accredited school of information science. But librarians have another source […]


Recent Growth of Preprint Servers

To understand why preprint servers are different, let’s start with a quick review of the article publishing process. (For a more entertaining review and explanation of preprint servers, click on the image below to watch a video from ASAPbio.) This example assumes your article is accepted by the first journal: write your manuscript submit to a […]


#ASAPbio and bioRxiv

Back in 2013, the researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory decided to emulate the physicists using arXiv and create a pre-print repository for biological papers. They called it bioRxiv. Use increased slowly, for several reasons. Biologists didn’t want their work to be ‘scooped’ and some were afraid that papers in bioaRxiv wouldn’t be accepted by […]


Top 100 papers as measured by Altmetric

Last March I blogged about altmetrics – how many times a journal article is mentioned in social media and news outlets. There are several companies that perform this work, but Altmetric publishes a list of the top 100 articles for the past year, as measured by them. They offer an interesting look at the articles […]


Lit Review Anxiety? Use our step-by-step guide.

Literature reviews can be tough. Whether you’re writing a standalone lit review or writing one to incorporate into a longer research article, they can be intimidating, time-consuming, and frustrating. Each step of the process presents a new challenge: finding information, quickly evaluating it for its appropriateness for your research, summarizing each article, synthesizing your information, […]


Represent JHU on the Global Stage

Back in October we asked you to take the 101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication survey. We still need graduate students and faculty to take this graphical survey; we’ll use the data to help us improve our library services and resources. You have until February 10, 2016, to take this quick survey about the tools you […]


Updating Peer Review

Peer reviewed journals are the bedrock of the STEM scholarly publishing system. Peer review is the process that ensures an article’s authors have used proper methods, cited previous work appropriately, and made logical and supported conclusions. There was even a Peer Review Week this fall. The process of peer review is changing for several reasons: […]


How do you research? We need to know!

What tools do you use to get your research done? Google Drive, MS Word, or Open Office? RefWorks, Zotero, or Mendeley? Google Scholar or Scopus? Your librarians want to know what tools you use so that we can optimize library services and resources to better serve your needs. Please take the 101 Innovations in Scholarly […]


What Publishers Think About Technology

The International Association of STM Publishers released their Tech Trends 2015 list as a set of infographics. It’s always an interesting list to librarians because we spend our time working with publishers, researchers, and technology. So you shouldn’t be surprised that JHU librarians have been creating services, guides, and blog posts along the same lines. […]