Want to Research Hopkins History This Summer? Apply by March 9 for a Hugh Hawkins Fellowship!

The Hopkins Retrospective program is now accepting applications for the Hugh Hawkins Research Fellowship for the Study of Hopkins History, a summer fellowship opportunity available to undergraduate and graduate students from any school of Hopkins. This fellowship is designed to give students the opportunity to explore an aspect of Hopkins history, digging into the university’s […]


Baltimore Bird and Tulip Tree

The Baltimore Oriole is more than just our hometown baseball mascot.  English naturalist Mark Catesby published The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands in 1771; one of the handsome, hand-colored engravings features our own “Baltimore Bird.” This edition of Catesby’s ornithological and botanical masterpieces is the first to include an index based on the […]


Digitized Daniel Coit Gilman correspondence now available

University Archives recently completed a project funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (the granting arm of the National Archives) to digitize approximately 65,000 pages of letters received and sent by Daniel Coit Gilman. Gilman was Johns Hopkins University’s first president and is widely regarded as one of history’s most important education innovators. […]


Pretty Sure You Didn’t Know This About Hopkins

You’re probably familiar with a lot of the JHU offices and centers; maybe you have visited the Office of Multicultural Affairs, checked equipment out of the Digital Media Center, or joined some of the more than 300 student organizations and clubs. JHU has lots and lots of offices and centers and institutes and initiatives, such […]


Science Fiction and Fantasy in Fall Classes

Hello again from your Sci Fi Librarian, with some tips about expressing your love of sci fi  and/or fantasy — reading *or* writing —  in classes being offered this Fall. (Read the full class description to see any restrictions.) In Visual Reality (Art, AS.371.149), students are encouraged to create representations of “alternative realities, those realities […]


Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, Professor of Greek

Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve, Johns Hopkins’ first professor of Greek, was born in 1831 in Charleston, South Carolina, and was orphaned at a young age. Gildersleeve proved to be a precocious child who displayed a hunger for classical learning. His determination took him first to the College of Charleston, then to Jefferson College in Pennsylvania and […]


Introducing Our Freshman Fellows: Faith Terry

For the past 5 months, I’ve been discovering what it means to be a student here at Hopkins. From the importance of academics and the shared sense of competition, to locating the steam tunnel entrances and avoiding the lines at the FFC, freshmen like me are just beginning to get the hang of being a […]