“Open in Order to” – Open Access Week 2017

“Open in Order to” is the theme of 2017’s Open Access Week. “Open in order to” invites us to share our reasons for making our research, data, journal articles, and educational materials openly and freely available!  Below are examples of the ways people and groups at JHU have openly shared research and educational information. Open […]


Library Shop Classes

Library shop classes? Of course! The Sheridan Libraries offer many tools to help you with your library research. While you can always stop at the Reference Consultation Office and Information Desk on M-level, use our Ask a Librarian service, or contact your liaison librarian with any questions you may have, we also offer a host […]


Lunch Bags and Laptops: Workshops About ORCID and Metrics

The Library is launching a new workshop series titled Lunch Bags and Laptops. The goal is to offer you a hands-on chance to examine different aspects of scholarly publishing. The first workshop will help you uniquely identify yourself as an author. The second will walk you through the different metrics and altmetrics that are available. […]


The Baltimore “Redlining” Map: Ranking Neighborhoods

For those studying Baltimore’s social, economic, and redevelopment history, one of the most frequently referenced maps in our collection is the Residential Security Map of Baltimore Md. Published in 1937 by the Federal Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC), this map is often called the Baltimore redlining map.  In drafting the map, cartographers used the colors […]


Why Not Read About Summer?

Image of books on a beach

The academic year is over, the Memorial Day picnic leftovers are in the fridge, and you’re starting to plan your summer activities. If you’re like me, one of the most important summer activities is summer reading! Trashy novels, breezy beach reads, it’s all waiting for you. Well, why not read about summer? A subject search […]


Fake News Changes Us

As we’ve all been learning recently, fake news really takes two forms: 1) information that is truly wrong and 2) accurate information that someone disagrees with. The first type (alternative facts?) can be disproven using any number of fact-checking sources that we’ve identified in our earlier post. The second type is a bit harder to […]


Protecting Yourself on the Web

As part of Choose Privacy Week, we thought we’d look at securing your web history. In March, Congress agreed to roll back consumer protections that kept internet service providers (ISPs) from selling your search history. Since then, there have been many articles posted that give us (the consumers) advice about what we should – or […]


Fake News: Check Your Facts

It’s a post-truth world out there (Oxford Dictionaries’ 2016 word of the year). And your librarians will help you tell truth from fiction. Our first post in this series discussed the history of fake news and propaganda. Now we’re going to give you some tools to investigate facts mentioned in news stories and the bias […]


Freedom for Government Information!

This week, March 12 – 18, is Sunshine Week and March 16th is Freedom of Information Day. Both events serve to remind us how we can obtain information from the federal government. The most important tool in that work is the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), which is administered by the Department of Justice. This […]