Want to Research Hopkins History This Summer? Apply by March 9 for a Hugh Hawkins Fellowship!

Students protesting outside administration offices, early 1970s. Johns Hopkins University Graphic and Pictorial Collection

Students protesting outside administration offices, early 1970s. Johns Hopkins University Graphic and Pictorial Collection

The Hopkins Retrospective program is now accepting applications for the Hugh Hawkins Research Fellowship for the Study of Hopkins History, a summer fellowship opportunity available to undergraduate and graduate students from any school of Hopkins. This fellowship is designed to give students the opportunity to explore an aspect of Hopkins history, digging into the university’s rich archives with the support and mentorship of archivist and faculty mentors. A fellowship award of $3500 is given to each recipient as a stipend to support your stay in Baltimore for a minimum of 8 weeks during the summer. Sharpen your research skills, experiment with new ways of sharing your work, and become an expert on a topic in Hopkins history that fascinates you!

Proposals on any aspect of Hopkins history are welcomed, and we’re especially interested in topics relating to the history of diversity at Hopkins or applications that propose a final product rooted in the digital humanities. Last year, our first cohort of fellows created digital projects on the history of the Hopkins Jewish community and the Homewood campus in the “age of protest” of the late 1960s/early 1970s, and a research paper on the Johns Hopkins Hospital and medical faculty’s role in access to abortion in Baltimore in the mid-20th century.

The application and guidelines are available here. If you have any questions as you prepare your application, please don’t hesitate to reach out to the archives via the contact information listed in the guidelines, or email hopkinsretro@jhu.edu. We can’t wait to hear your ideas for this summer!

About Jenny Kinniff

Jenny Kinniff is the Program Manager for Hopkins Retrospective, an initiative to explore the history of Hopkins and weave it into the university experience.

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